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ask   primarily, this blog is about images, in both, photography and the arts | DISQUS is available for comments on individual posts

. . . . sometimes NSFW
REAR WINDOW LOOP (2010) | a visual installation by Jeff Desom based on footage from Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 “Rear Window”
to see the loop, go here: http://jeffdesom.com/hitch/
Golden Nica 2012 & Vimeo Remix Award 2012
________________________________
Powered by After Effects and the patience of Job, Jeff Desom recut (and reshaped) Rear Window into one giant panorama. It’s shocking enough that Hitchcock shot the film in such a manner to make this reassembly possible. But crazier still, Desom’s product works out to be a 20-minute loop that plays out completely logically. | from here: http://bit.ly/15VGk5N
Image source: http://jeffdesom.com/hitch/
bonus for all Hitchcock fans: “A Vision of Rear Window” http://vimeo.com/8898520

REAR WINDOW LOOP (2010) | a visual installation by Jeff Desom based on footage from Alfred Hitchcock's 1954 “Rear Window

to see the loop, go here: http://jeffdesom.com/hitch/

Golden Nica 2012 & Vimeo Remix Award 2012

________________________________

Powered by After Effects and the patience of Job, Jeff Desom recut (and reshaped) Rear Window into one giant panorama. It’s shocking enough that Hitchcock shot the film in such a manner to make this reassembly possible. But crazier still, Desom’s product works out to be a 20-minute loop that plays out completely logically. | from here: http://bit.ly/15VGk5N

Image source: http://jeffdesom.com/hitch/

bonus for all Hitchcock fans: “A Vision of Rear Window” http://vimeo.com/8898520

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago

#Rear Window Loop  #visual installation  #Jeff Desom  #panorama  #Alfred Hitchcock  #film  #movie  #movies  #Rear Window 
André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Mondrian Studio”, Paris, 1926

Gelatin silver print, printed 1950s | 22.5 x 17.8 cm | titled, dated in pencil and credit stamp on the verso | estimate $6,000 - 8,000 | sold for $7,500 (!)
see also: http://bit.ly/10lxF41 for another Mondrian image by Kertész
________________________________
Trained for a career in the stock exchange, Kertész devoted his earnings and free time to explore his intrigue for photography. His early images of family members and the Hungarian countryside emulated drawings and etchings found in magazines of the day. However, the work he created during this period reveals a finely developed vision, present from the moment he first picked up the camera in 1912. André’s early ability to construct lyrical images, infused with personal insight and wit, remained a constant throughout his long career in photography. In 1925, André moved to Paris to fulfill his dream of working as a photographer. His pioneering vision, by now well established, brought him instant success. His approach to the medium defined the shape of photojournalism in Europe. During the next ten years, Kertész built an extraordinary body of work, influenced by and influencing the many artists with whom he interacted in Paris between the wars. André Kertész left Paris for New York in 1936 on what was meant to be a one year sabbatical. From the beginning, his career in the United States proved problematic. His vision, personality and artistic temperament never found a place in American photojournalism. Unable to return to Europe, he accepted a contract to work for House and Garden magazine in 1949, where he languished for thirteen years. Although adored by Conde Nast for shaping the look of the magazine, André dismissed this period as his “lost years”. In 1962, at the age of 68, André broke his contract to pursue his artistic career. For the next 23 years he photographed with the recaptured enthusiasm of his early years in Hungary and Paris. Kertész’s work in this period was prolific and by the time he passed away in 1985, he had been re-established as a major figure in the history of photography. Honoured by artists and photographers, collected by major museums and galleries, the subject of scholarly studies, and with over twenty books published in his name, André Kertész’s long battle for recognition had been won. - Robert Gurbo, Curator of the Estate of André Kertész | from here: http://www.bulgergallery.com/
Image source: http://bit.ly/10luGIC

André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Mondrian Studio”, Paris, 1926

Gelatin silver print, printed 1950s | 22.5 x 17.8 cm | titled, dated in pencil and credit stamp on the verso | estimate $6,000 - 8,000 | sold for $7,500 (!)

see also: http://bit.ly/10lxF41 for another Mondrian image by Kertész

________________________________

Trained for a career in the stock exchange, Kertész devoted his earnings and free time to explore his intrigue for photography. His early images of family members and the Hungarian countryside emulated drawings and etchings found in magazines of the day. However, the work he created during this period reveals a finely developed vision, present from the moment he first picked up the camera in 1912. André’s early ability to construct lyrical images, infused with personal insight and wit, remained a constant throughout his long career in photography.

In 1925, André moved to Paris to fulfill his dream of working as a photographer. His pioneering vision, by now well established, brought him instant success. His approach to the medium defined the shape of photojournalism in Europe. During the next ten years, Kertész built an extraordinary body of work, influenced by and influencing the many artists with whom he interacted in Paris between the wars.

André Kertész left Paris for New York in 1936 on what was meant to be a one year sabbatical. From the beginning, his career in the United States proved problematic. His vision, personality and artistic temperament never found a place in American photojournalism. Unable to return to Europe, he accepted a contract to work for House and Garden magazine in 1949, where he languished for thirteen years. Although adored by Conde Nast for shaping the look of the magazine, André dismissed this period as his “lost years”.

In 1962, at the age of 68, André broke his contract to pursue his artistic career. For the next 23 years he photographed with the recaptured enthusiasm of his early years in Hungary and Paris. Kertész’s work in this period was prolific and by the time he passed away in 1985, he had been re-established as a major figure in the history of photography. Honoured by artists and photographers, collected by major museums and galleries, the subject of scholarly studies, and with over twenty books published in his name, André Kertész’s long battle for recognition had been won. - Robert Gurbo, Curator of the Estate of André Kertész | from here: http://www.bulgergallery.com/

Image source: http://bit.ly/10luGIC

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 1 note

#photography  #art  #Black and White  #fine art  #fine art photography  #vintage  #1926  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #andre kertesz  #Hungarian-American  #mondrian studio  #Paris  #France  #interior  #interiors  #interieur  #roof light  #window  #curtain  #easel  #canvas  #stool  #bed  #covers  #Light and Shade  #shadows  #contrast  #geometric 
André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Chez Mondrian”, Paris, 1926 | © Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures


Piet Mondrian, Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue, 1930
—|_|____|-|___|-|_|=|=|__|_|———-
Our initial thoughts when we first studied the photograph were loneliness this is because there is a mass emptiness within the image. This feeling is re enforced by the first part of research we did. Kertész moved to Paris in 1925, a year before the photograph was taken. We feel the photograph reflects his loneliness because he left behind his various family members including his ‘unofficial’ fiancée, two brothers, and an uncle.
Kertész’s photograph was influenced by Piet Mondrian, a  Dutch painter who discovered Cubism. The photograph was actually taken in Mondrian’s artist studio which features an artificial flower. Mondrian wanted to express the impression of pure reality. The artificial flower which is at the edge of the table suggests that it was moved to be in the frame of the image. We know that Mondrian would always have an artificial flower in his studio as an expression of nature, so adding the flower to Kertész’s image is almost a nod to the original studio.
The composition of the image is divided in half, the left being the foreground and the right the background.The left side reflects cubism, the influential movement that started in that very studio by the straight lines in the furniture and doorway. However the curves of the staircase in the background soften the profusion of right angles and straight lines, representing breaking away from a particular era which was the artistic movement in the 1920’s and keeping individuality.The image in itself is very contrast with very subtle midtones. The only section that we notice to have any greyscale to it is the flower. The greyscale in this gives the flower more detail and more depth, purposely done along with the lighting of it to draw the eye of the viewer.
At the time the image was made Paris was being taken over by the art deco movement all very grand and a lot of decoration which is the complete opposite to what is shown of the studio, being very plain and simple. Also in Paris at this time was the demand for personal freedom, again mirroring the photographer’s decision to move to Paris on his own. | from here: http://bit.ly/18sC4ta
________________________________
André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism. | for more on Kertész, go here: http://bit.ly/ZIn5EW
Image source: http://bit.ly/10ijL8f

André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Chez Mondrian”, Paris, 1926 | © Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures

image

Piet Mondrian, Composition with Red, Yellow and Blue, 1930

—|_|____|-|___|-|_|=|=|__|_|———-

Our initial thoughts when we first studied the photograph were loneliness this is because there is a mass emptiness within the image. This feeling is re enforced by the first part of research we did. Kertész moved to Paris in 1925, a year before the photograph was taken. We feel the photograph reflects his loneliness because he left behind his various family members including his ‘unofficial’ fiancée, two brothers, and an uncle.

Kertész’s photograph was influenced by Piet Mondrian, a  Dutch painter who discovered Cubism. The photograph was actually taken in Mondrian’s artist studio which features an artificial flower. Mondrian wanted to express the impression of pure reality. The artificial flower which is at the edge of the table suggests that it was moved to be in the frame of the image. We know that Mondrian would always have an artificial flower in his studio as an expression of nature, so adding the flower to Kertész’s image is almost a nod to the original studio.

The composition of the image is divided in half, the left being the foreground and the right the background.The left side reflects cubism, the influential movement that started in that very studio by the straight lines in the furniture and doorway. However the curves of the staircase in the background soften the profusion of right angles and straight lines, representing breaking away from a particular era which was the artistic movement in the 1920’s and keeping individuality.The image in itself is very contrast with very subtle midtones. The only section that we notice to have any greyscale to it is the flower. The greyscale in this gives the flower more detail and more depth, purposely done along with the lighting of it to draw the eye of the viewer.

At the time the image was made Paris was being taken over by the art deco movement all very grand and a lot of decoration which is the complete opposite to what is shown of the studio, being very plain and simple. Also in Paris at this time was the demand for personal freedom, again mirroring the photographer’s decision to move to Paris on his own. | from here: http://bit.ly/18sC4ta

________________________________

André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism. | for more on Kertész, go here: http://bit.ly/ZIn5EW

Image source: http://bit.ly/10ijL8f

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 6 notes

#photography  #art  #Black and White  #fine art  #fine art photography  #vintage  #1926  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #andre kertesz  #hungarian  #Chez Mondrian  #Paris  #empty rooms  #interiors  #interieur  #piet mondrian  #staircase  #banister  #step  #Table  #vase  #flowers  #hatstand  #hat  #stone floor  #Light and Shade  #shadow  #geometric 
André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Tulipe Melancolique”, 1939 | © Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures
________________________________
André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.
Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazine, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France’s first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.
Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.
Kertész’s first encounters with magazine photography inspired him to learn photography. He was also influenced by certain paintings by Lajos Tihanyi and Gyula Zilzer, as well as by poetry.
Hungarian period | After earning enough money, Kertész quickly bought his first camera (an ICA box camera) in 1912, despite his family’s protests to continue his career in business. In his free time, he photographed the local peasants, gypsies, and landscape of the surrounding Hungarian Plains (the puszta).
In 1914, at the age of 20, he was sent to the front line, where he took photographs of life in the trenches with a lightweight camera (a Goerz Tenax).
Most of these photographs were destroyed during the violence of the Hungarian Revolution of 1919. Wounded in 1915… [snip]*
French period | Kertész emigrated to Paris in September 1925. Kertész was among numerous Hungarian artists who emigrated during these decades, including François Kollar, Robert Capa, Emeric Fehér, Brassaï, and Julia Bathory. Man Ray, Germaine Krull and Lucien Aigner also emigrated to Paris during this period.
Initially Kertész took on commissioned work for several European magazines, gaining publication of his work in Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain. Soon after arriving in Paris, Kertész changed his first name to André, which he kept for the rest of his life. In Paris he found critical and commercial success. In 1927 Kertész was… [snip]*
Pending war | Social and political tensions were rising in Europe with the growing strength in Germany of the Nazi Party. Many magazines emphasized stories about political topics and stopped publishing Kertész because of his apolitical subjects. With his commissioned work dropping and persecution of Jews increasing, Kertész and his wife, Elizabeth, decided to move to New York. He was offered work at the Keystone agency owned by Ernie Prince. In 1936, Kertész and Elizabeth boarded… [snip]*
Kertész found life in America more difficult than he had imagined, beginning a period which he later referred to as the “absolute tragedy”. Deprived of his artist friends, he also found that Americans rejected having their photos taken on the street. Soon after his arrival, Kertész… [snip]*
Vogue invited the photographer to work for the magazine, but he declined, believing it was not appropriate work for him. He chose to work for Life magazine, starting with a piece called The Tugboat. Despite orders, he photographed more than just tugboats, including works on the entire harbour and its activities. Life refused to publish the unauthorized photographs. Kertész resented the constraints on his curiosity.
In 25 October 1938, Look printed a series of Kertesz photographs, entitled A Fireman Goes to School; but… [snip]*
Kertész was naturalised on 3 February 1944.
Critical evaluation | Throughout most of his career Kertész was depicted as the “unknown soldier” who worked behind the scenes of photography, yet was rarely cited for his work, even into his death in the 1980s.Kertész thought himself unrecognised throughout his life, despite spending his life in the eternal search for acceptance and fame. Though Kertész received numerous awards for photography, he never felt both his style and work was accepted by critics and art audiences alike. Although, in 1927, he was… [snip]*
Image source: http://bit.ly/10ijL8f
________________________________
[snip]* read on here: http://bit.ly/17IzVIA

André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Tulipe Melancolique”, 1939 | © Estate of André Kertész/Higher Pictures

________________________________

André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazine, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France’s first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

Kertész’s first encounters with magazine photography inspired him to learn photography. He was also influenced by certain paintings by Lajos Tihanyi and Gyula Zilzer, as well as by poetry.

Hungarian period | After earning enough money, Kertész quickly bought his first camera (an ICA box camera) in 1912, despite his family’s protests to continue his career in business. In his free time, he photographed the local peasants, gypsies, and landscape of the surrounding Hungarian Plains (the puszta).

In 1914, at the age of 20, he was sent to the front line, where he took photographs of life in the trenches with a lightweight camera (a Goerz Tenax).

Most of these photographs were destroyed during the violence of the Hungarian Revolution of 1919. Wounded in 1915… [snip]*

French period | Kertész emigrated to Paris in September 1925. Kertész was among numerous Hungarian artists who emigrated during these decades, including François Kollar, Robert Capa, Emeric Fehér, Brassaï, and Julia Bathory. Man Ray, Germaine Krull and Lucien Aigner also emigrated to Paris during this period.

Initially Kertész took on commissioned work for several European magazines, gaining publication of his work in Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain. Soon after arriving in Paris, Kertész changed his first name to André, which he kept for the rest of his life. In Paris he found critical and commercial success. In 1927 Kertész was… [snip]*

Pending war | Social and political tensions were rising in Europe with the growing strength in Germany of the Nazi Party. Many magazines emphasized stories about political topics and stopped publishing Kertész because of his apolitical subjects. With his commissioned work dropping and persecution of Jews increasing, Kertész and his wife, Elizabeth, decided to move to New York. He was offered work at the Keystone agency owned by Ernie Prince. In 1936, Kertész and Elizabeth boarded… [snip]*

Kertész found life in America more difficult than he had imagined, beginning a period which he later referred to as the “absolute tragedy”. Deprived of his artist friends, he also found that Americans rejected having their photos taken on the street. Soon after his arrival, Kertész… [snip]*

Vogue invited the photographer to work for the magazine, but he declined, believing it was not appropriate work for him. He chose to work for Life magazine, starting with a piece called The Tugboat. Despite orders, he photographed more than just tugboats, including works on the entire harbour and its activities. Life refused to publish the unauthorized photographs. Kertész resented the constraints on his curiosity.

In 25 October 1938, Look printed a series of Kertesz photographs, entitled A Fireman Goes to School; but… [snip]*

Kertész was naturalised on 3 February 1944.

Critical evaluation | Throughout most of his career Kertész was depicted as the “unknown soldier” who worked behind the scenes of photography, yet was rarely cited for his work, even into his death in the 1980s.Kertész thought himself unrecognised throughout his life, despite spending his life in the eternal search for acceptance and fame. Though Kertész received numerous awards for photography, he never felt both his style and work was accepted by critics and art audiences alike. Although, in 1927, he was… [snip]*

Image source: http://bit.ly/10ijL8f

________________________________

[snip]* read on here: http://bit.ly/17IzVIA

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 2 notes

#photography  #monochrome  #Black and White  #sepia  #fine art  #fine art photography  #vintage  #1939  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #andré kertész  #Hungarian-American  #Tulipe Melancolique  #flower  #tulip  #vase  #contrast  #chiaroscuro  #abstract  #still life 
André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Eiffel Tower, Paris”, 1929
________________________________
André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazine, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France’s first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.
Kertész’s first encounters with magazine photography inspired him to learn photography. He was also influenced by certain paintings by Lajos Tihanyi and Gyula Zilzer, as well as by poetry.
Hungarian period | After earning enough money, Kertész quickly bought his first camera (an ICA box camera) in 1912, despite his family’s protests to continue his career in business. In his free time, he photographed the local peasants, gypsies, and landscape of the surrounding Hungarian Plains (the puszta).
In 1914, at the age of 20, he was sent to the front line, where he took photographs of life in the trenches with a lightweight camera (a Goerz Tenax).
Most of these photographs were destroyed during the violence of the Hungarian Revolution of 1919. Wounded in 1915 …*






Circus, Budapest, 19 May 1920



French period | Kertész emigrated to Paris in September 1925. Kertész was among numerous Hungarian artists who emigrated during these decades, including François Kollar, Robert Capa, Emeric Fehér, Brassaï, and Julia Bathory. Man Ray, Germaine Krull and Lucien Aigner also emigrated to Paris during this period.
Initially Kertész took on commissioned work for several European magazines, gaining publication of his work in Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain. Soon after arriving in Paris, Kertész changed his first name to André, which he kept for the rest of his life. In Paris he found critical and commercial success. In 1927 Kertész was …*





The Fork, or La Fourchette, was taken in 1928 and is one of Kertész’s most famous works from this period.








Distortion#49, one of the images in the Distortion series Kertész took during 1933


Pending war | Social and political tensions were rising in Europe with the growing strength in Germany of the Nazi Party. Many magazines emphasized stories about political topics and stopped publishing Kertész because of his apolitical subjects. With his commissioned work dropping and persecution of Jews increasing, Kertész and his wife, Elizabeth, decided to move to New York. He was offered work at the Keystone agency owned by Ernie Prince. In 1936, Kertész and Elizabeth boarded…*
Kertész found life in America more difficult than he had imagined, beginning a period which he later referred to as the “absolute tragedy”. Deprived of his artist friends, he also found that Americans rejected having their photos taken on the street. Soon after his arrival, Kertész …*
Vogue invited the photographer to work for the magazine, but he declined, believing it was not appropriate work for him. He chose to work for Life magazine, starting with a piece called The Tugboat. Despite orders, he photographed more than just tugboats, including works on the entire harbour and its activities. Life refused to publish the unauthorized photographs. Kertész resented the constraints on his curiosity.
In 25 October 1938, Look printed a series of Kertesz photographs, entitled A Fireman Goes to School; but …*

Kertész was naturalised on 3 February 1944.
Critical evaluation | Throughout most of his career Kertész was depicted as the “unknown soldier” who worked behind the scenes of photography, yet was rarely cited for his work, even into his death in the 1980s.Kertész thought himself unrecognised throughout his life, despite spending his life in the eternal search for acceptance and fame. Though Kertész received numerous awards for photography, he never felt both his style and work was accepted by critics and art audiences alike. Although, in 1927, he was …*
Image source: http://bit.ly/107gyH6
________________________________
…* | read on here: http://bit.ly/17IzVIA

André Kertész, Hungarian-American (1894-1985) - “Eiffel Tower, Paris”, 1929

________________________________

André Kertész, born Kertész Andor, was a Hungarian-born photographer known for his ground breaking contributions to photographic composition and the photo essay. In the early years of his career, his then-unorthodox camera angles and style prevented his work from gaining wider recognition. Kertész never felt that he had gained the worldwide recognition he deserved. Today he is considered one of the seminal figures of photojournalism.

Expected by his family to work as a stockbroker, Kertész pursued photography independently as an autodidact, and his early work was published primarily in magazine, a major market in those years. This continued until much later in his life, when Kertész stopped accepting commissions. He served briefly in World War I and moved to Paris in 1925, then the artistic capital of the world, against the wishes of his family. In Paris he worked for France’s first illustrated magazine called VU. Involved with many young immigrant artists and the Dada movement, he achieved critical and commercial success.

Due to German persecution of the Jews and the threat of World War II, Kertész decided to emigrate to the United States in 1936, where he had to rebuild his reputation through commissioned work. In the 1940s and 1950s, he stopped working for magazines and began to achieve greater international success. His career is generally divided into four periods, based on where he was working and his work was most prominently known. They are called the Hungarian period, the French period, the American period and, toward the end of his life, the International period.

Kertész’s first encounters with magazine photography inspired him to learn photography. He was also influenced by certain paintings by Lajos Tihanyi and Gyula Zilzer, as well as by poetry.

Hungarian period | After earning enough money, Kertész quickly bought his first camera (an ICA box camera) in 1912, despite his family’s protests to continue his career in business. In his free time, he photographed the local peasants, gypsies, and landscape of the surrounding Hungarian Plains (the puszta).

In 1914, at the age of 20, he was sent to the front line, where he took photographs of life in the trenches with a lightweight camera (a Goerz Tenax).

Most of these photographs were destroyed during the violence of the Hungarian Revolution of 1919. Wounded in 1915 …*

Circus, Budapest, 19 May 1920


French period | Kertész emigrated to Paris in September 1925. Kertész was among numerous Hungarian artists who emigrated during these decades, including François Kollar, Robert Capa, Emeric Fehér, Brassaï, and Julia Bathory. Man Ray, Germaine Krull and Lucien Aigner also emigrated to Paris during this period.

Initially Kertész took on commissioned work for several European magazines, gaining publication of his work in Germany, France, Italy and Great Britain. Soon after arriving in Paris, Kertész changed his first name to André, which he kept for the rest of his life. In Paris he found critical and commercial success. In 1927 Kertész was …*

The Fork, or La Fourchette, was taken in 1928 and is one of Kertész’s most famous works from this period.

Distortion#49, one of the images in the Distortion series Kertész took during 1933

Pending war | Social and political tensions were rising in Europe with the growing strength in Germany of the Nazi Party. Many magazines emphasized stories about political topics and stopped publishing Kertész because of his apolitical subjects. With his commissioned work dropping and persecution of Jews increasing, Kertész and his wife, Elizabeth, decided to move to New York. He was offered work at the Keystone agency owned by Ernie Prince. In 1936, Kertész and Elizabeth boarded…*

Kertész found life in America more difficult than he had imagined, beginning a period which he later referred to as the “absolute tragedy”. Deprived of his artist friends, he also found that Americans rejected having their photos taken on the street. Soon after his arrival, Kertész …*

Vogue invited the photographer to work for the magazine, but he declined, believing it was not appropriate work for him. He chose to work for Life magazine, starting with a piece called The Tugboat. Despite orders, he photographed more than just tugboats, including works on the entire harbour and its activities. Life refused to publish the unauthorized photographs. Kertész resented the constraints on his curiosity.

In 25 October 1938, Look printed a series of Kertesz photographs, entitled A Fireman Goes to School; but …*

Kertész was naturalised on 3 February 1944.

Critical evaluation | Throughout most of his career Kertész was depicted as the “unknown soldier” who worked behind the scenes of photography, yet was rarely cited for his work, even into his death in the 1980s.Kertész thought himself unrecognised throughout his life, despite spending his life in the eternal search for acceptance and fame. Though Kertész received numerous awards for photography, he never felt both his style and work was accepted by critics and art audiences alike. Although, in 1927, he was …*

Image source: http://bit.ly/107gyH6

________________________________

…* | read on here: http://bit.ly/17IzVIA

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 4 notes

#photography  #Street Photography  #Black and White  #fine art  #fine art photography  #photojournalism  #vintage  #1929  #history  #Leica  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #andré kertész  #Hungarian-American  #Eiffel Tower  #Paris  #France  #aerial view  #contrast  #chiaroscuro  #abstract patterns  #people  #pavement  #cars  #road  #engineering  #iron  #arches 
Eugène Atget, French (1857-1927) - “Marchand de vin, 15 rue Boyer" [Wine Mercheant], 1910-1911
Gelatin-silver print (printed by Berenice Abbott) | Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.
________________________________
“Marchand de vin, 15 rue Boyer" vividly demonstrates Atget’s ability to elevate a seemingly mundane setting to the level of art. Because the interior of the wine bar is dimly lit, sharp contrasts of dark and light animate the composition. To build drama in the image and focus more light on the murky room, Atget positioned his lens to capture reflections cast from the front windows onto the bar mirror. The formal interplay of lines from the open front doors and stair railing, seen in the mirror, resonate with other patterns in the image. Another hallmark of Atget’s exceptional style is evident here: the long exposure required to achieve a precise quality of light. What might have been a drab image of a commonplace locale becomes, in his hands, an eloquent work, one among many in his landmark portrait of a vanished Paris. - Patricia McDonnell, director of the Ulrich Museum of Art | from here: http://bit.ly/16agWsD
Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.

He picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.

Atget photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.

Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.

In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.

Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.

The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4

Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/
noteworthy: the tap at the end of the counter

Eugène Atget, French (1857-1927) - “Marchand de vin, 15 rue Boyer" [Wine Mercheant], 1910-1911

Gelatin-silver print (printed by Berenice Abbott) | Gift of Walter P. Chrysler, Jr., Chrysler Museum of Art, Norfolk, VA.

________________________________

Marchand de vin, 15 rue Boyer" vividly demonstrates Atget’s ability to elevate a seemingly mundane setting to the level of art. Because the interior of the wine bar is dimly lit, sharp contrasts of dark and light animate the composition. To build drama in the image and focus more light on the murky room, Atget positioned his lens to capture reflections cast from the front windows onto the bar mirror. The formal interplay of lines from the open front doors and stair railing, seen in the mirror, resonate with other patterns in the image. Another hallmark of Atget’s exceptional style is evident here: the long exposure required to achieve a precise quality of light. What might have been a drab image of a commonplace locale becomes, in his hands, an eloquent work, one among many in his landmark portrait of a vanished Paris. - Patricia McDonnell, director of the Ulrich Museum of Art | from here: http://bit.ly/16agWsD

Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.

He picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.

Atget photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.

Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.

In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.

Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.

The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4

Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/

noteworthy: the tap at the end of the counter

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 5 notes

#photography  #documentary photography  #milieu  #vintage  #1910  #History  #monochrome  #gelatin silver print  #plate camera  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #eugène atget  #French  #Marchand de vin 15 rue Boyer  #wine mercheant  #Paris  #staircase  #windows  #doors  #counter  #wood  #marble  #tap  #mirror  #shelves  #glasses  #light fittings  #mosaic floor  #interior 
Eugène Atget, French (1857-1927) - ‘Cour, 41 rue Broca’, 1912 Albumen silver print, 6 5/8 x 8 1/4″ (16.9 x 21 cm) | The Museum of Modern Art, New York - (Berenice) Abbott-Levy Collection. Partial gift of Shirley C. Burden
________________________________
Atget clearly relished the metaphorical and physical aspects of the courtyard - a space that hovers between public and private, interior and exterior - and he photographed scores of them, both rural and urban.
Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.
He picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.
He photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.
Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.
In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.
Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.
The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4
Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/
.
hint: look out for the two children in the first floor window on the right

Eugène Atget, French (1857-1927) - ‘Cour, 41 rue Broca’, 1912

Albumen silver print, 6 5/8 x 8 1/4″ (16.9 x 21 cm) | The Museum of Modern Art, New York - (Berenice) Abbott-Levy Collection. Partial gift of Shirley C. Burden

________________________________

Atget clearly relished the metaphorical and physical aspects of the courtyard - a space that hovers between public and private, interior and exterior - and he photographed scores of them, both rural and urban.

Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.

He picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.

He photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.

Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.

In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.

Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.

The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4

Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/

.

hint: look out for the two children in the first floor window on the right

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 18 notes

#photography  #street photograhy  #documentary photography  #milieu  #vintage  #1912  #History  #monochrome  #albumen silver  #plate camera  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #eugène atget  #French  #Cour 41 rue Broca  #Paris  #France  #courtyard  #poverty  #deriliction  #cobblestones  #staircase  #stairwell  #windows  #children  #carpets  #flowers  #doors  #refuse 
"We live in a society of victimization in which people are much more comfortable being victimized than actually standing up for themselves."
Marilyn Manson (via creatingaquietmind)

(Source: the-healing-nest, via colourthysoul)

— 1 year ago with 516 notes

Eugène Atget (French, 1857-1927) - ‘Cour, 7 rue de Valance’, June 1922

Matte albumen silver print, 7 x 8 15/16″ (17.8 x 22.7 cm) | The Museum of Modern Art, New York - (Berenice) Abbott-Levy Collection. Partial gift of Shirley C. Burden
________________________________
Atget clearly relished the metaphorical and physical aspects of the courtyard - a space that hovers between public and private, interior and exterior - and he photographed scores of them, both rural and urban. The motif was chosen as the backdrop for what was likely Atget’s first photograph of an automobile (Cour, 7 rue de Valence), and it was versatile enough to transform itself depending on where Atget placed his camera. The dark areas that appear in the upper corners of some prints are the result of vignetting: a technique in which the light coming through the camera’s lens does not fully cover the glass plate negative, allowing Atget to create an arched pictorial space that echoed the physical one before his camera. | from here: http://bit.ly/10vU91M
Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.
.




Organ Grinder (1898)


.




Avenue des Gobelins (1927)


.
Atget picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.
He photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.
Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.
In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.
Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.
The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4
Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/

Eugène Atget (French, 1857-1927) - ‘Cour, 7 rue de Valance’, June 1922

Matte albumen silver print, 7 x 8 15/16″ (17.8 x 22.7 cm) | The Museum of Modern Art, New York - (Berenice) Abbott-Levy Collection. Partial gift of Shirley C. Burden

________________________________

Atget clearly relished the metaphorical and physical aspects of the courtyard - a space that hovers between public and private, interior and exterior - and he photographed scores of them, both rural and urban. The motif was chosen as the backdrop for what was likely Atget’s first photograph of an automobile (Cour, 7 rue de Valence), and it was versatile enough to transform itself depending on where Atget placed his camera. The dark areas that appear in the upper corners of some prints are the result of vignetting: a technique in which the light coming through the camera’s lens does not fully cover the glass plate negative, allowing Atget to create an arched pictorial space that echoed the physical one before his camera. | from here: http://bit.ly/10vU91M

Atget was a French photographer noted for his photographs documenting the architecture and street scenes of Paris. An inspiration for the surrealists and other artists, his work gained wide attention only after his death.

.

Organ Grinder (1898)

.

Avenue des Gobelins (1927)

.

Atget picked up photography in the late 1880s, around the time that photography was experiencing unprecedented expansion in both commercial and amateur fields. He would go on to enter the commercial field with his photos; he sold photos of landscapes, flowers, and other pleasantries to other artists. It wasn’t until 1897 that he started a project he would continue for the rest of his life-his Old Paris collection.

He photographed Paris with a large-format wooden bellows camera with a rapid rectilinear lens. The images were exposed and developed as 18x24cm glass dry plates.

Between 1897 and 1927 he captured the old Paris in his pictures. His photographs show the city in its various facets: narrow lanes and courtyards in the historic city center with its old buildings, of which some were soon to be demolished, magnificent palaces from the period before the French Revolution, bridges and quays on the banks of the Seine, and shops with their window displays. He photographed stairwells and architectural details on the façades and took pictures of the interiors of apartments. His interest also extended to the environs of Paris.

In addition to architecture and the urban environment, he also photographed street-hawkers, small tradesmen, rag collectors and prostitutes, as well as fairs and popular amusements in the various districts. The outlying districts and peripheral areas, in which the poor and homeless sought shelter, also furnished him with pictorial subjects.

Distinguishing characteristics of Atget’s photography include a wispy, drawn-out sense of light due to his long exposures, a fairly wide view that suggested space and ambiance more than surface detail, and an intentionally limited range of scenes avoiding the bustling modern Paris that was often around the corner from the nostalgia-steeped nooks he preferred. The emptiness of most of his streets and the sometimes blurred figures in those with people are partly due to his already antiquated technique, including extended exposure times which required that many of his images be made in the early morning hours before pedestrians and traffic appeared.

The mechanical vignetting often seen at some corners of his photographs is due to… | read on here: http://bit.ly/ZIc0Y4

Image source: http://artblart.com/category/eugene-atget/

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 6 notes

#photography  #Street Photography  #documentary photography  #vintage  #1922  #history  #monochrome  #albumen silver  #Plate camera  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #eugène atget  #French  #Cour 7 rue de Valance  #Paris  #France  #courtyard  #garage  #motorbikes  #car  #convertible  #drop-head  #staircase  #roof  #dormer windows  #derilict  #poverty 
Roman Vishniac (Russian-American, 1897-1900) - Untitled [Street scene with swastika flag in background, Berlin] ca. 1935-36
© Mara Vishniac Kohn | Courtesy International Center of Photography
________________________________
Revealing “a compositional acuity, inventiveness, and surprising stylistic range” - in other words traces of Josef Sudek, Walker Evans, Alexander Rodchenko and New Photography - Vishniac’s best work is a record of its troubled time: a photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. What the viewing public must be made aware of is the curatorial reinterpretation of his work, seeking as it does to solidify his place “among the 20th century’s most accomplished photographers.”
While some of the work on view may be new, the claims of curator Maya Benton must be observed with a good deal of scepticism. What we need to understand is how his photographs are being interpreted across a range of frames of reference - from photojournalism, to social documentary photography and art - in order, as Maya Benton says, to “reposition” his iconic photographs within the broader tradition of social documentary photography. This repositioning is a form of re/visioning of an artist’s work to place it in a different context or frame of reference in order to increase its significance; or, by exclusion (as in the case of the S/M photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe that have been occluded by the Mapplethorpe Foundation), another context, make the work of an artist more socially palatable than would otherwise be the case.
The interpretation of Vishniac’s photographs becomes problematic depending on what frame of reference one applies to them and how their interpretation is negotiated between multiple, fluid points of view. Repositioning an artist’s work within a broader context changes the nature of the interpretation of that artist’s work and raises the pertinent question: who is repositioning this work and for what reason(s); who is pushing that agenda and curatorial barrow (in Benton’s case it is because she wants Vishniac’s work to be seen as that of a modern master, to make the credibility of the exhibition and the artist more than it possibly is). What we must be fully aware of is the time and place in which Vishniac made the work and the conditions for its initial reception, not some stake in the ground claim of modern mastership.
Vishniac’s photographs frame the historical discourse of the end of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe and the rise of Fascism in Germany with erudition - for the past, present and future. Any other claims to eclecticism, applying different “repositioning” in particular cases, seems inelegant and shows a lack of consistency in clear thinking. When you really look at his work there is a sensitivity to the human condition in his work that is outstanding, coupled with a clear compositional structure and use of chiaroscuro. He was an excellent visual artist who had strong pre-visualisation that is evidenced in the prints. These photographs make insightful comment on the surrounding culture at the time of their production. Nothing more grandiose need be said.
Dr Marcus Bunyan for the Art Blart blog | from here: http://bit.ly/110r06l
Image source: http://bit.ly/110r06l

Roman Vishniac (Russian-American, 1897-1900) - Untitled [Street scene with swastika flag in background, Berlin] ca. 1935-36

© Mara Vishniac Kohn | Courtesy International Center of Photography

________________________________

Revealing “a compositional acuity, inventiveness, and surprising stylistic range” - in other words traces of Josef Sudek, Walker Evans, Alexander Rodchenko and New Photography - Vishniac’s best work is a record of its troubled time: a photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. What the viewing public must be made aware of is the curatorial reinterpretation of his work, seeking as it does to solidify his place “among the 20th century’s most accomplished photographers.”

While some of the work on view may be new, the claims of curator Maya Benton must be observed with a good deal of scepticism. What we need to understand is how his photographs are being interpreted across a range of frames of reference - from photojournalism, to social documentary photography and art - in order, as Maya Benton says, to “reposition” his iconic photographs within the broader tradition of social documentary photography. This repositioning is a form of re/visioning of an artist’s work to place it in a different context or frame of reference in order to increase its significance; or, by exclusion (as in the case of the S/M photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe that have been occluded by the Mapplethorpe Foundation), another context, make the work of an artist more socially palatable than would otherwise be the case.

The interpretation of Vishniac’s photographs becomes problematic depending on what frame of reference one applies to them and how their interpretation is negotiated between multiple, fluid points of view. Repositioning an artist’s work within a broader context changes the nature of the interpretation of that artist’s work and raises the pertinent question: who is repositioning this work and for what reason(s); who is pushing that agenda and curatorial barrow (in Benton’s case it is because she wants Vishniac’s work to be seen as that of a modern master, to make the credibility of the exhibition and the artist more than it possibly is). What we must be fully aware of is the time and place in which Vishniac made the work and the conditions for its initial reception, not some stake in the ground claim of modern mastership.

Vishniac’s photographs frame the historical discourse of the end of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe and the rise of Fascism in Germany with erudition - for the past, present and future. Any other claims to eclecticism, applying different “repositioning” in particular cases, seems inelegant and shows a lack of consistency in clear thinking. When you really look at his work there is a sensitivity to the human condition in his work that is outstanding, coupled with a clear compositional structure and use of chiaroscuro. He was an excellent visual artist who had strong pre-visualisation that is evidenced in the prints. These photographs make insightful comment on the surrounding culture at the time of their production. Nothing more grandiose need be said.

Dr Marcus Bunyan for the Art Blart blog | from here: http://bit.ly/110r06l

Image source: http://bit.ly/110r06l

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 3 notes

#photography  #Street Photography  #Black and White  #photojournalism  #documentary photography  #vintage  #1935  #history  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #roman vishniac  #Russian-American  #Berlin  #Germany  #Street Scene  #Straßenszene in Berlin  #cobblestones  #pedestrians  #children  #pushchair  #cyclists  #car  #horse cart  #building  #facade  #advertising  #swastika  #hakenkreuz  #shops 
Roman Vishniac (Russian-American, 1897-1900) - Untitled [Interior of the Anhalter Bahnhof , a railway terminus near Potsdamer Platz, Berlin] late 1920s-early 1930s
© Mara Vishniac Kohn | Courtesy International Center of Photography
________________________________
Revealing “a compositional acuity, inventiveness, and surprising stylistic range” - in other words traces of Josef Sudek, Walker Evans, Alexander Rodchenko and New Photography - Vishniac’s best work is a record of its troubled time: a photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. What the viewing public must be made aware of is the curatorial reinterpretation of his work, seeking as it does to solidify his place “among the 20th century’s most accomplished photographers.”
While some of the work on view may be new, the claims of curator Maya Benton must be observed with a good deal of scepticism. What we need to understand is how his photographs are being interpreted across a range of frames of reference - from photojournalism, to social documentary photography and art - in order, as Maya Benton says, to “reposition” his iconic photographs within the broader tradition of social documentary photography. This repositioning is a form of re/visioning of an artist’s work to place it in a different context or frame of reference in order to increase its significance; or, by exclusion (as in the case of the S/M photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe that have been occluded by the Mapplethorpe Foundation), another context, make the work of an artist more socially palatable than would otherwise be the case.
The interpretation of Vishniac’s photographs becomes problematic depending on what frame of reference one applies to them and how their interpretation is negotiated between multiple, fluid points of view. Repositioning an artist’s work within a broader context changes the nature of the interpretation of that artist’s work and raises the pertinent question: who is repositioning this work and for what reason(s); who is pushing that agenda and curatorial barrow (in Benton’s case it is because she wants Vishniac’s work to be seen as that of a modern master, to make the credibility of the exhibition and the artist more than it possibly is). What we must be fully aware of is the time and place in which Vishniac made the work and the conditions for its initial reception, not some stake in the ground claim of modern mastership.
Vishniac’s photographs frame the historical discourse of the end of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe and the rise of Fascism in Germany with erudition - for the past, present and future. Any other claims to eclecticism, applying different “repositioning” in particular cases, seems inelegant and shows a lack of consistency in clear thinking. When you really look at his work there is a sensitivity to the human condition in his work that is outstanding, coupled with a clear compositional structure and use of chiaroscuro. He was an excellent visual artist who had strong pre-visualisation that is evidenced in the prints. These photographs make insightful comment on the surrounding culture at the time of their production. Nothing more grandiose need be said.
Dr Marcus Bunyan for the Art Blart blog | from here: http://bit.ly/110r06l
Image source: http://artblart.com/tag/a-vanished-world/
_______________________________
Exhibition: ‘Roman Vishniac Rediscovered’ at the International Center of Photography (ICP), New York from 18th January to 5th May 2013

Roman Vishniac (Russian-American, 1897-1900) - Untitled [Interior of the Anhalter Bahnhof , a railway terminus near Potsdamer Platz, Berlin] late 1920s-early 1930s

© Mara Vishniac Kohn | Courtesy International Center of Photography

________________________________

Revealing “a compositional acuity, inventiveness, and surprising stylistic range” - in other words traces of Josef Sudek, Walker Evans, Alexander Rodchenko and New Photography - Vishniac’s best work is a record of its troubled time: a photographic record of Jewish life in Eastern Europe between the two World Wars. What the viewing public must be made aware of is the curatorial reinterpretation of his work, seeking as it does to solidify his place “among the 20th century’s most accomplished photographers.”

While some of the work on view may be new, the claims of curator Maya Benton must be observed with a good deal of scepticism. What we need to understand is how his photographs are being interpreted across a range of frames of reference - from photojournalism, to social documentary photography and art - in order, as Maya Benton says, to “reposition” his iconic photographs within the broader tradition of social documentary photography. This repositioning is a form of re/visioning of an artist’s work to place it in a different context or frame of reference in order to increase its significance; or, by exclusion (as in the case of the S/M photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe that have been occluded by the Mapplethorpe Foundation), another context, make the work of an artist more socially palatable than would otherwise be the case.

The interpretation of Vishniac’s photographs becomes problematic depending on what frame of reference one applies to them and how their interpretation is negotiated between multiple, fluid points of view. Repositioning an artist’s work within a broader context changes the nature of the interpretation of that artist’s work and raises the pertinent question: who is repositioning this work and for what reason(s); who is pushing that agenda and curatorial barrow (in Benton’s case it is because she wants Vishniac’s work to be seen as that of a modern master, to make the credibility of the exhibition and the artist more than it possibly is). What we must be fully aware of is the time and place in which Vishniac made the work and the conditions for its initial reception, not some stake in the ground claim of modern mastership.

Vishniac’s photographs frame the historical discourse of the end of Jewish culture in Eastern Europe and the rise of Fascism in Germany with erudition - for the past, present and future. Any other claims to eclecticism, applying different “repositioning” in particular cases, seems inelegant and shows a lack of consistency in clear thinking. When you really look at his work there is a sensitivity to the human condition in his work that is outstanding, coupled with a clear compositional structure and use of chiaroscuro. He was an excellent visual artist who had strong pre-visualisation that is evidenced in the prints. These photographs make insightful comment on the surrounding culture at the time of their production. Nothing more grandiose need be said.

Dr Marcus Bunyan for the Art Blart blog | from here: http://bit.ly/110r06l

Image source: http://artblart.com/tag/a-vanished-world/

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Exhibition: ‘Roman Vishniac Rediscovered’ at the International Center of Photography (ICP), New York from 18th January to 5th May 2013

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 4 notes

#photography  #Street Photography  #black and white  #fine art  #fine art photography  #chiaroscuro  #photojournalism  #vintage  #1920s  #1930's  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #Roman Vishniac  #Russian-American  #Berlin  #German  #anhalter bahnhof  #STATION  #train station  #interior  #shadows  #Light and Shade  #people  #doors  #windows  #street  #horse cart 
candentia:

Tilda Swinton in ‘Stranger Than Paradise’
Photographer: Tim Walker
Dress: Ann Demeulemeester S/S 2013
W Magazine May 2013

Androgynous Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton takes her unique and eccentric beauty to the cover of the May issue of W magazine.
The 52-year-old ageless beauty talks unconventional beauty with the magazine.
“Being beautiful was never really something I associated with people I knew - certainly not girls. Boys, maybe. Horses, yes, and certainly my great-grandmother Elsie Swinton, whose imperial grandeur was like a watermark”, Tilda tells W.
For her dramatic and high-fashion editorial, styled by Jacob K and photographed by noted Tim Walker [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Walker ], the ‘Only Lovers Left Alive‘ star dons avant-garde designs from Gucci, Alexander McQueen, Rick Owens, Louis Vuitton, Vera Wang, Maison Martin Margiela, Azzedine Alaia, Balmain, Acne, Prada, Celine, Armani, Rochas, Max Mara, Mary Katrantzou, Francesco Scognamiglio, Haider Ackermann, Ann Demeulemeester and Givenchy.
______________________________
http://timwalkerphotography.com/

candentia:

Tilda Swinton in ‘Stranger Than Paradise’

Photographer: Tim Walker

Dress: Ann Demeulemeester S/S 2013

W Magazine May 2013

Androgynous Oscar-winning actress Tilda Swinton takes her unique and eccentric beauty to the cover of the May issue of W magazine.

The 52-year-old ageless beauty talks unconventional beauty with the magazine.

“Being beautiful was never really something I associated with people I knew - certainly not girls. Boys, maybe. Horses, yes, and certainly my great-grandmother Elsie Swinton, whose imperial grandeur was like a watermark”, Tilda tells W.

For her dramatic and high-fashion editorial, styled by Jacob K and photographed by noted Tim Walker [ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tim_Walker ], the ‘Only Lovers Left Alive‘ star dons avant-garde designs from Gucci, Alexander McQueen, Rick Owens, Louis Vuitton, Vera Wang, Maison Martin Margiela, Azzedine Alaia, Balmain, Acne, Prada, Celine, Armani, Rochas, Max Mara, Mary Katrantzou, Francesco Scognamiglio, Haider Ackermann, Ann Demeulemeester and Givenchy.

______________________________

http://timwalkerphotography.com/

(Source: alainpress, via deadsunflower)

— 1 year ago with 292 notes

#photography  #fashion photography  #fine art photography  #ArtPhotography  #fine art  #contemporary  #magazines  #features  #colour  #color  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #Tim Walker  #w magazine  #British  #tilda swinton  #actress  #androgynous  #pale  #black and white dress  #gloves  #avant garde  #elaborate set  #staircase  #columns  #windows  #modernistic  #church 
Boris Lipnitzki [Lipnitski] (Russian, 1887-1971) - Danielle Darrieux in the play, "Jeu dangereux", by Henri Decoin, Paris, Théâtre de la Madelaine, 1937
________________________________
Danielle Yvonne Marie Antoinette Darrieux, born on this day, 1st May 1917, is a French actress and singer, who has appeared in more than 110 films since 1931. She is one of France’s great movie stars and her eight-decade career is among the longest in film history.
.
Boris Lipnitzki was a photographer born in Oster (north-east of Kiev ) in 1887 who died in Paris in 1971.

 His talent quickly earned him a reputation in the world of entertainment and the arts in particular.

 His light striking portraits of Maurice Ravel to Paul Poiret, of Louis Jouvet to Brigitte Bardot, Serge Gainsbourg and Picasso, brought us close up [familiarised us] with the monsters that made ​​the arts of the last century, from the Roaring Twenties to the 1960s.

 Its extensive studio Street Coliseum (Paris), a real family business involved in the assault of all Paris culture, the land Harcourt studio will soon occupy.

 Production, large, will partly suffered from flooding the Athenaeum Theatre. This is indeed where his friend Louis Jouvet had helped to hide the photographic plates during the Occupation. | Google Translate from here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Lipnitzky

.

Boris Lipnitzki came to live in Paris in 1921. There he met Paul Poiret who introduced him to this clientele, set up his first studio and began a career as an up and coming photographer. Beginning in 1924, he published his photographs of the fashion business in Femina and Excelsior (Heim, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Rouff….), photographs of celebrities (Josephine Baker, Dulin, Artaud, Cocteau, Jouvet, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Michel Simon, Colette) and took pictures of celebrations and society events. He frequented the Russian community in Paris, visiting artists’ studios and theatres, photographing ballet and theatre decors, as well as the designers and the performers (Fokine, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Lifar among others). He fled occupied France during the war, meeting up again with Marc Chagall in New York. After the war, he and his brothers founded the Lipnitski Studio which until the end of the sixties covered Paris theatre, ballet and opera events. Boris Lipnitski died in Paris in 1971. | from here: http://bit.ly/Zh3bkb
Image source: http://bit.ly/Ycd6Kw

Boris Lipnitzki [Lipnitski] (Russian, 1887-1971) - Danielle Darrieux in the play, "Jeu dangereux", by Henri Decoin, Paris, Théâtre de la Madelaine, 1937

________________________________

Danielle Yvonne Marie Antoinette Darrieux, born on this day, 1st May 1917, is a French actress and singer, who has appeared in more than 110 films since 1931. She is one of France’s great movie stars and her eight-decade career is among the longest in film history.

.

Boris Lipnitzki was a photographer born in Oster (north-east of Kiev ) in 1887 who died in Paris in 1971.

His talent quickly earned him a reputation in the world of entertainment and the arts in particular.

His light striking portraits of Maurice Ravel to Paul Poiret, of Louis Jouvet to Brigitte Bardot, Serge Gainsbourg and Picasso, brought us close up [familiarised us] with the monsters that made ​​the arts of the last century, from the Roaring Twenties to the 1960s.

Its extensive studio Street Coliseum (Paris), a real family business involved in the assault of all Paris culture, the land Harcourt studio will soon occupy.

Production, large, will partly suffered from flooding the Athenaeum Theatre. This is indeed where his friend Louis Jouvet had helped to hide the photographic plates during the Occupation. | Google Translate from here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Lipnitzky

.

Boris Lipnitzki came to live in Paris in 1921. There he met Paul Poiret who introduced him to this clientele, set up his first studio and began a career as an up and coming photographer. Beginning in 1924, he published his photographs of the fashion business in Femina and Excelsior (Heim, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Rouff….), photographs of celebrities (Josephine Baker, Dulin, Artaud, Cocteau, Jouvet, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Michel Simon, Colette) and took pictures of celebrations and society events. He frequented the Russian community in Paris, visiting artists’ studios and theatres, photographing ballet and theatre decors, as well as the designers and the performers (Fokine, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Lifar among others). He fled occupied France during the war, meeting up again with Marc Chagall in New York. After the war, he and his brothers founded the Lipnitski Studio which until the end of the sixties covered Paris theatre, ballet and opera events. Boris Lipnitski died in Paris in 1971. | from here: http://bit.ly/Zh3bkb

Image source: http://bit.ly/Ycd6Kw

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 4 notes

#photography  #theatre  #art photography  #fine art  #vintage  #1937  #Black and White  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #boris lipnitzki  #lipnitzky  #russian  #danielle darrieux  #play  #Jeu dangereux  #Théâtre de la Madelaine  #Paris  #france  #woman  #actress  #standing  #three-quarter length  #portrait  #elegant  #smoking  #cigarette  #fur coat  #sleveless dress  #wallpaper 
Boris Lipnitzki [Lipnitski] (Russian, 1887-1971) - ‘Locomotive aérodynamique à la Gare de Lyon, Paris’, 1937
________________________________
Lipnitzki was a photographer born in Oster (north-east of Kiev ) in 1887 who died in Paris in 1971.
 His talent quickly earned him a reputation in the world of entertainment and the arts in particular.
 His light striking portraits of Maurice Ravel to Paul Poiret, of Louis Jouvet to Brigitte Bardot, Serge Gainsbourg and Picasso, brought us close up [familiarised us] with the monsters that made ​​the arts of the last century, from the Roaring Twenties to the 1960s.
 Its extensive studio Street Coliseum (Paris), a real family business involved in the assault of all Paris culture, the land Harcourt studio will soon occupy.
 Production, large, will partly suffered from flooding the Athenaeum Theatre. This is indeed where his friend Louis Jouvet had helped to hide the photographic plates during the Occupation. | Google Translate from here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Lipnitzky
.
Boris Lipnitzki came to live in Paris in 1921. There he met Paul Poiret who introduced him to this clientele, set up his first studio and began a career as an up and coming photographer. Beginning in 1924, he published his photographs of the fashion business in Femina and Excelsior (Heim, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Rouff….), photographs of celebrities (Josephine Baker, Dulin, Artaud, Cocteau, Jouvet, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Michel Simon, Colette) and took pictures of celebrations and society events. He frequented the Russian community in Paris, visiting artists’ studios and theatres, photographing ballet and theatre decors, as well as the designers and the performers (Fokine, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Lifar among others). He fled occupied France during the war, meeting up again with Marc Chagall in New York. After the war, he and his brothers founded the Lipnitski Studio which until the end of the sixties covered Paris theatre, ballet and opera events. Boris Lipnitski died in Paris in 1971. | from here: http://bit.ly/Zh3bkb
Image source: http://travelparty.tumblr.com/post/23822683552/gare-de-lyon-1935-par-boris-lipnitzki

Boris Lipnitzki [Lipnitski] (Russian, 1887-1971) - ‘Locomotive aérodynamique à la Gare de Lyon, Paris’, 1937

________________________________

Lipnitzki was a photographer born in Oster (north-east of Kiev ) in 1887 who died in Paris in 1971.

His talent quickly earned him a reputation in the world of entertainment and the arts in particular.

His light striking portraits of Maurice Ravel to Paul Poiret, of Louis Jouvet to Brigitte Bardot, Serge Gainsbourg and Picasso, brought us close up [familiarised us] with the monsters that made ​​the arts of the last century, from the Roaring Twenties to the 1960s.

Its extensive studio Street Coliseum (Paris), a real family business involved in the assault of all Paris culture, the land Harcourt studio will soon occupy.

Production, large, will partly suffered from flooding the Athenaeum Theatre. This is indeed where his friend Louis Jouvet had helped to hide the photographic plates during the Occupation. | Google Translate from here: http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boris_Lipnitzky

.

Boris Lipnitzki came to live in Paris in 1921. There he met Paul Poiret who introduced him to this clientele, set up his first studio and began a career as an up and coming photographer. Beginning in 1924, he published his photographs of the fashion business in Femina and Excelsior (Heim, Schiaparelli, Chanel, Rouff….), photographs of celebrities (Josephine Baker, Dulin, Artaud, Cocteau, Jouvet, Giraudoux, Anouilh, Michel Simon, Colette) and took pictures of celebrations and society events. He frequented the Russian community in Paris, visiting artists’ studios and theatres, photographing ballet and theatre decors, as well as the designers and the performers (Fokine, Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Lifar among others). He fled occupied France during the war, meeting up again with Marc Chagall in New York. After the war, he and his brothers founded the Lipnitski Studio which until the end of the sixties covered Paris theatre, ballet and opera events. Boris Lipnitski died in Paris in 1971. | from here: http://bit.ly/Zh3bkb

Image source: http://travelparty.tumblr.com/post/23822683552/gare-de-lyon-1935-par-boris-lipnitzki

(Source: alainpress)

— 1 year ago with 2 notes

#photography  #fashion photography  #ArtPhotography  #fine art  #vintage  #1937  #history  #black and white  #photos  #photographs  #photographer  #boris lipnitzki  #lipnitzky  #russian  #Paris  #gare de lyon  #Locomotive aérodynamique  #platform  #models  #women  #ladies  #elegant  #overcoats  #hats  #handbags  #standing and looking  #admiring  #nostalgia  #railways  #steam locomotive